Woman comforting her friend

Grief is hard to deal with when you lose a loved one who battled cancer. In Indiana, lung and colon-rectum cancer are the second and ninth causes of death according to the 2014 World Life Expectancy list. You can help relatives and friends overcome this difficult period.

You can spend quality time with them, put them in bereavement programs in Indiana, and give them space and solitude to help them heal. But there are other things you can do during the grieving process.

Five Ways You Can Help

1. Respect the Person’s Situation
There are stages of grief, and each one has its depth of pain. Know the details of their situation, let them mourn in their own way, and accept what they have to say.

2. Offer a Listening Ear
During these times, reach out and spend some time with the grieving person. Having someone around them may alleviate the suffering they’re experiencing.

3. Reach Out but Don’t Pry
Providing your time is important but always give space. The griever requires time alone to go through the process of denying the situation, mourning about it, until they reach acceptance.

4. Avoid “Fixing” the Problem
There is nothing you can do. Don’t attempt to give any advice or try to share similar experiences to the griever. Making sense of the situation is counterproductive, so it is best to be there and listen.

5. “Walk” with Them
Once they have accepted their circumstance, go through the process with them. Invite them to activities or give them a hand in going back to their routines.

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Turn Things Around to Help More

For those who have family members or friends struggling with any cancer-related issues, grief and loss are sometimes inevitable. The National Cancer Institute reports that from 2008 to 2012, over a hundred thousand men and women in America have died because of this illness, leaving many grieving families and friends who find it hard to cope.

When the griever recuperates, encourage them in the advocacy to fight cancer. Let it be an opportunity to lighten the burden for anyone else who is going through the same pain.